• Andrew Johnson with Sioux delegation at White House

    Andrew Johnson

    National Historic Site Tennessee

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Trading Cards

Kids! Collect stories about the Civil War and civil rights! The National Park Service is offering more than 500 trading cards to mark the 150th anniversary of the Civil War. Visit a park in person to earn a card (sorry, cards cannot be mailed). Ask a ranger or stop by the visitor center at a participating park. You can view all the cards online and discover stories from nearly 90 national parks in 31 states and the District of Columbia. You'll be surprised at what you will learn.

 
Military Governor

Andrew Johnson
Military Governor of Tennessee

NPS

Andrew Johnson

Brevet Brigadier General

Before becoming president, Andrew Johnson served as Military Governor of Tennessee during the Civil War. From 1862-1865 he reestablished a Union government in the state. His efforts resulted in a convention that revised the state constitution, voided secession, abolished slavery, and rejected the Confederacy. Shortly afterwards, Tennessee became the first state to rejoin the Union.

 
Campaign Poster

Lincoln and Johnson
Campaign Poster

NPS

Lincoln and Johnson

Reuniting North and South

Abraham Lincoln and Andrew Johnson were elected President and Vice-President in 1864.This previously unheard of combination-a Republican and Democrat running together on the same ticket-was called the National Union Party. It represented both the North and South and symbolically reunited the two sides of the country after the Civil War.

 
Mary Edwards Walker

Dr. Mary Edwards Walker

NPS

Earning the Medal of Honor

Dr. Mary Edwards Walker served as a Union surgeon during the Civil War. Andrew Johnson observed, "She has performed service deserving the recognition of the Government, which I desire to give..." With Johnson's signature, she became the first-and remains the only-woman to receive the Congressional Medal of Honor.

 
Sam

Sam Johnson

NPS

From Slave to Advocate


Sam, Andrew Johnson's former slave, became a Freedmen's Bureau Commissioner following the Civil War in Greeneville, TN-Johnson's hometown. He sent a letter to President Johnson, asking to buy land for a "School House for the education of the Coloured children of Greeneville…" Andrew Johnson gave Sam the tract of land for this purpose.

 
Dolly

Dolly and Andrew Johnson Stover

NPS

Freeing Dolly

Emancipation Day in Tennessee

Dolly, Andrew Johnson's first slave, holds his grandson. Although Johnson owned at least ten slaves, he freed them on August 8, 1863- still recognized as Emancipation Day in Tennessee. He freed all Tennessee's slaves in 1864. As thanks, freedmen gave him a watch inscribed, "…for his untiring energy in the cause of Freedom."

 
Charles

Charles Johnson

NPS

Charles Johnson

Crisis of Conscience

Although forced to take the Confederate oath of allegiance, Andrew Johnson's son Charles escaped East Tennessee and joined the Union Army as an assistant surgeon with the 10th Tennessee Infantry. His life was cut tragically short when he was thrown from a horse and killed shortly after the Battle of Stones River in 1863.

 
Robert

Robert Johnson

NPS

Robert Johnson

The Heartbreak of War

Andrew Johnson's son Robert followed in his father's political footsteps as Tennessee's State Representative. He voted against secession from the Union and helped organize the 1st Tennessee Cavalry, serving as colonel. However, when his brother died in 1863, Robert succumbed to depression and alcoholism. Unable to perform his duties, he resigned from the Union Army.

 
Mary

Mary Johnson Stover

NPS

Mary Johnson Stover

Holding Down the Homefront

Mary Stover and her husband supported Union efforts in Confederate Tennessee. He burned bridges to halt Confederate advance and in 1861 retreated to the wintery mountains to avoid capture. Meanwhile, Mary tended to their three children, their farm, and provided refuge for her mother and brother. The family escaped through Confederate lines in 1862.

 
Homestead

Andrew Johnson Homestead in Greeneville, TN

NPS

Forced to Leave the Homestead

Andrew Johnson's family was evicted from their home in East Tennessee in 1862 because they supported the Union. The Homestead served as a hospital and headquarters for both armies, including US Colored Troops. Soldiers, particularly Confederates from "Looney's Brigade," left expressive graffiti on the walls as poignant reminders of their occupation of the Johnson's home.

 
Lick Creek Bridge

Burning the Lick Creek bridge

Courtesy of Dr. George Blanks

The Bridge Burners

Led by Capt. David Fry, Union supporters in East Tennessee burned bridges in the region to help free it from Confederate control in November 1861. Though they successfully burned some bridges, five men from Greene County, including some locally celebrated potters, were hanged for their deeds. This painting by Dr. George Blanks recreates the scene.

 

Did You Know?

Dolly and Andrew Johnson Stover

According to William Johnson, a former slave belonging to Andrew Johnson, William's mother Dolly asked Andrew Johnson to purchase her because she thought he looked kind. Johnson bought not only Dolly, but her brother Sam as well.