• North HillSide Photomerge

    Andersonville

    National Historic Site Georgia

Prisoner of War Museum to Host Book Signing with Vietnam POW Bill Robinson

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Date: January 10, 2014
Contact: Eric Leonard , 229 924-0343, ext. 201

ANDERSONVILLE, Georgia – The National Park Service will be hosting former Vietnam POW Bill Robinsonand historian Glenn Robins, author of the recent biography The Longest Rescue: The Life and Legacy of Vietnam POW William A. Robinson at the National Prisoner of War Museum at Andersonville National Historic Site on Saturday, January 18, 2014 from 10:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m.

No enlisted man has been held longer than Captain William A. Robinson (USAF Ret.).While serving as a crew chief aboard a U.S. Air Force Rescue helicopter, Airman First Class Robinson was shot down and captured in the Tinh Province, North Vietnam, September 20, 1965.After a short stint at the infamous "Hanoi Hilton," Robinson endured 2,703 days in multiple Vietnamese prison camps, including Briarpatch and various compounds at Cu Loc, during which he faced daily privations and was subjected to the full range of North Vietnam's torture program. A native of North Carolina, Robinson now lives in Madisonville, Tennessee.

Glenn Robins, professor of history at Georgia Southwestern State University, is editor of They Have Left Us Here to Die: The Civil War Prison Diary of Sgt. Lyle G. Adair, 111th U.S. Colored Infantry and coeditor of America and the Vietnam War: Re-examining the Culture and History of a Generation.

Andersonville National Historic Site is located 10 miles south of Oglethorpe, GA and 10 miles northeast of Americus, GA on Georgia Highway 49. The national park features the National Prisoner of War Museum, Andersonville National Cemetery and the site of the historic Civil War prison, Camp Sumter. ­Andersonville National Historic Site is the only national park within the National Park System to serve as a memorial to all American prisoners of war. Park grounds are open from 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. The National Prisoner of War Museum is open 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., daily. Admission is free. For more information on the park, call 229 924-0343, or visit at www.nps.gov/ande/ Visit us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/AndersonvilleNPS, Twitter www.twitter.com/andeNHS

www.nps.gov

About the National Park Service. More than 20,000 National Park Service employees care for America's 401 national parks and work with communities across the nation to help preserve local history and create close-to-home recreational opportunities. Learn more at www.nps.gov.

Did You Know?

The HMS Jersey in 1782

Around 30,000 Americans were kept as prisoners of war in and around New York City during the Revolutionary War. Most of these prisoners were held in warehouses, churches, and on ships in nearby harbors. An estimated 18,000 (60%) died as prisoners from 1775 to 1783. Of those, over 10,000 are thought to have perished on prison ships, most notably the Whitby and the Jersey.