• North HillSide Photomerge

    Andersonville

    National Historic Site Georgia

Special Program at Andersonville: Son of a Korean War POW to speak

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Date: October 29, 2012
Contact: Eric Leonard, 229 924-0343, ext. 201

ANDERSONVILLE, Georgia - Join us on Saturday November 10 at 3:00 p.m. for a special program in the theater of the National Prisoner of War Museum at Andersonville National Historic Site. Park volunteer Pat Curry will tell the story of his father's 33 month imprisonment in North Korea from 1950 through 1953, and how it affected his family.

This program is in addition to regularly scheduled interpretive programs occurring over the Veterans Day weekend. At 2:00 p.m. on Veterans Day, Sunday November 11, a special program will also be held at the Illinois Monument in the Andersonville National Cemetery.

Andersonville National Historic Site is located 10 miles south of Oglethorpe, GA and 10 miles northeast of Americus, GA on Georgia Highway 49. The national park features the National Prisoner of War Museum, Andersonville National Cemetery and the site of the historic Civil War prison, Camp Sumter. ­Andersonville National Historic Site is the only national park within the National Park System to serve as a memorial to all American prisoners of war. Park grounds are open from 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. with the museum opening at 9:00 a.m. Admission is free. For more information on the park, call 229 924-0343, visit on the web at www.nps.gov/ande/, or find us on Facebook at facebook.com/AndersonvilleNPS

www.nps.gov

About the National Park Service. More than 20,000 National Park Service employees care for America's 398 national parks and work with communities across the nation to help preserve local history and create close-to-home recreational opportunities. Learn more at www.nps.gov.

 

Resources:
News Release [PDF file]

Did You Know?

Detail of headstone showing inscription

Two unknown Union soldiers are buried in Grave 13,718. These prisoner deaths were discovered in 1899 when heavy rains exposed their remains within the prison site. It is thought that they died as a result of suffocation from a cave-in or a shelter or well.