• North HillSide Photomerge

    Andersonville

    National Historic Site Georgia

Civil War to Civil Rights Trading Cards

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Some of the Andersonville Trading Cards available
NPS/Andersonville National Historic Site

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Date: June 21, 2012
Contact: Eric Leonard, 229 924-0343, x.201

Trading cards have been popular with kids for generations, from images of sports figures to movie stars. Now, Andersonville National Historic Site is offering nine free trading cards featuring different individuals, places, or stories which explore the story of the Andersonville prison. Officially known as the Camp Sumter military prison, Andersonville was the largest Confederate military prisons during the Civil War. During the 14 months the prison existed, more than 45,000 Union soldiers were confined here.

The cards available at Andersonville are part of a series of 550 cards available at participating national parks throughout the United States. To "earn" a trading card, kids may participate in a ranger-led tour or answer a question about their visit to the park.

"The trading cards are vehicles for telling some 'lesser-known' stories - including the stories of civilians, women, African-Americans and American Indians," said Superintendent Brad Bennett. The trading cards are a great way to engage kids with our history as a nation, both here at Andersonvilleand throughout the United States. According to Bennett, the cards also provide an incentive to families with children to visit all parks which offer the cards.

Each trading card tells a little-known story but collectively the cards describe the struggles we have endured as a nation to strive for freedom and equality. The 150th Anniversary of the American Civil War and the 50th Anniversary of the Civil Rights Movement provide opportunities for us to reflect upon our past, celebrate the strides we have made and look forward with commitment to achieve a more perfect union.

Andersonville National Historic Site is located 10 miles south of Oglethorpe, GA and 10 miles northeast of Americus, GA on Georgia Highway 49. The national park features the National Prisoner of War Museum, Andersonville National Cemetery and the site of the historic Civil War prison, Camp Sumter. ­Andersonville National Historic Site is the only national park within the National Park System to serve as a memorial to all American prisoners of war. Park grounds are open from 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. with the museum opening at 9:00 a.m. Admission is free. For more information on the park, call 229 924-0343, visit on the web at www.nps.gov/ande/, or find us on Facebook at facebook.com/AndersonvilleNPS

 

Resources:
News Release [PDF file]

Did You Know?

Historic photograph of Boston Corbett

Boston Corbett (Sgt 16th NY Cavalry), the man credited with killing John Wilkes Booth, was a prisoner at Andersonville. After the war, he briefly worked in the Kansas House of Representatives as a doorkeeper. He was sent to an asylum and, after escaping, he disappeared from history.