• North HillSide Photomerge

    Andersonville

    National Historic Site Georgia

National Prisoner of War Museum to Host Author John Siegfried

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Date: November 19, 2011
Contact: Eric Leonard, 229 924-0343, ext. 201

ANDERSONVILLE, Georgia - The National Park Service and Eastern National will be hosting author John Siegfried at the National Prisoner of War Museum at Andersonville National Historic Site on Saturday, November 26, 2011 from 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. His recent book, Six Degrees of the Bracelet: Vietnam's Continuing Grip, uses the symbol of the silver bracelets that were created to raise awareness of, and show support for, American servicemen who were prisoners of war (POW) or missing in action (MIA) as a beginning point for exploring the continuing stories of Americans affected by their experiences in Vietnam.

Eastern National is a 501(c)3 non-profit cooperating association, operating in more than 150 national parks, including Andersonville National Historic Site. Proceeds from the Eastern National sales outlet at the National Prisoner of War Museum are donated to the National Park Service to support educational and interpretive programs.

Andersonville National Historic Site is located 10 miles south of Oglethorpe, GA and 10 miles northeast of Americus, GA on Georgia Highway 49. The site features the National Prisoner of War Museum, Andersonville National Cemetery and the site of the historic Civil War prison, Camp Sumter. ­Andersonville National Historic Site is a unit of the National Park System and serves as a memorial to all American prisoners of war. Park grounds are open from 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. with the museum opening at 9:00 a.m. Admission is free. For more information on the park, call 229 924-0343, visit on the web at www.nps.gov/ande/, or find us on Facebook at facebook.com/AndersonvilleNPS

 

Resources:
News Release [64KB PDF file]

Did You Know?

Canvas, rubber, and wooden shelters

Shebang was one name given by a small number of prisoners at Andersonville to the crude shelters that they constructed out of wood and scraps of cloth. More frequently used names were hut, hovel, tent, shanty, and hole in the ground. More...