• North HillSide Photomerge

    Andersonville

    National Historic Site Georgia

Laws & Policies

To Protect Visitors and Resources: Policies and Regulations
There are a variety of documents that guide the management of Andersonville National Historic Site. Many documents, like the National Environmental Policy Act, articulate legal requirements to which federal entities must adhere. Other documents, like the park's General Management Plan and Superintendent's Compendium, are formal documents that create a "contract" between the park and the public. Still others, like Director's and Superintendent Orders, direct how Andersonville and other national park units will operate.

The information available in this section will allow you to become more aware of park implementation plans and of how park operations are structured toward success in achieving the NPS mission of preserving unimpaired park resources for the enjoyment of future generations. These pages also include specific regulations on a variety of activities within the park.

Federal Laws
Laws are created by Congress and establish the highest order of legal authority over national parks. More...

  • Many laws, including the 1916 Organic Act that created the National Park Service, affect all areas managed by the National Park Service.
  • Each park is established through enabling legislation passed by Congress.

NPS Policies
Service-wide policy for the National Park Service is developed by the Office of Policy with public input and in accordance with applicable laws. Policies dictate many of the overall directions and procedures used by all parks. More...

Director's Order #61 and Reference Manual #61 cover National Cemetery Operations within those cemeteries administered by the National Park Service.

Park Regulations
The Code of Federal Regulations and the Superintendent's Compendium provide a complete listing of park rules and regulations. These more specific rules are developed with public input to implement applicable law.

Some regulations may be subject to change.

See also:

Did You Know?

Historic photograph of Boston Corbett

Boston Corbett (Sgt 16th NY Cavalry), the man credited with killing John Wilkes Booth, was a prisoner at Andersonville. After the war, he briefly worked in the Kansas House of Representatives as a doorkeeper. He was sent to an asylum and, after escaping, he disappeared from history.