• North HillSide Photomerge

    Andersonville

    National Historic Site Georgia

Management

Fawn resting against a row of white marble headstones
A fawn rests against headstones at the rear of section H in the national cemetery.
NPS/E. Leonard
 

"The future of this historic spot cannot fail to constitute a subject of deep and abiding interest to the people of this entire country, and it would seem fitting that it should be preserved as one of the sanctuaries of the Nation, and be in due time decorated with appropriate honors."
~ Clara Barton, 1865

Andersonville National Historic Site was authorized by Congress in 1970 to preserve the site of the Camp Sumter Military Prison, commonly known as Andersonville, and to interpret the story of prisoners of war throughout American History. Like each of its sister national parks, Andersonville must balance the competing demands of its dual mission: providing for a fulfilling visitor experience and preserving the historic resources located here.

Please explore this section for information on statistics and employment, to learn how park staff are planning for the future of the park for our visitors, and to learn about the park is preparing for the National Park Service's 100th anniversary in 2016.

Did You Know?

Graves of the victims of the smallpox hospital at Andersonville.

A smallpox hospital was built two miles south of the Andersonville prison to isolate infected prisoners. In operation only four months, 50% of the prisoners admitted there died of the disease. The 64 graves of the smallpox hospital were moved to Andersonville National Cemetery in 1867.