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    Andersonville

    National Historic Site Georgia

Getting Ready for 2016

The National Park Service turns 100 on August 25, 2016. To us, it's not about cakes and candles — it's about being an organization ready to take on the challenges of our second century. Our blueprint to get there — A Call to Action — outlines the innovative work we want to accomplish. Andersonville National Historic Site is a big part of this effort. Take a look at what we're doing locally and get involved!

 

  • New Traveling Exhibit to Share the Prisoner of War Story With New Audiences

    A group of people stand by exhibit panels and cut a red ribbon.

    A multi-year partnership resulted in the completion of "Victory From Within: The American Prisoner of War Experience," a new traveling exhibit produced by Andersonville National Historic Site in partnership with the Friends of Andersonville and American Ex-Prisoners of War. Read more

  • Andersonville Connects To Its Civil Rights Past

    Park ranger and men stand in an open field area behind a stone monument labeled

    Inspired by researching the January 1, 1869 Emancipation Day service at Andersonville National Cemetery, park staff have made significant strides toward better interpreting African American history at the prison site and national cemetery. Read more

  • Park-to-Park Bike Rides Connect Parks and New Audiences

    Bicycles ride past a series of stone monuments

    Andersonville NHS and Jimmy Carter NHS work with community partners and Georgia State parks on a series of bicyle ride events which connect new audiences to the parks in southwest Georgia. Read more

  • Andersonville Explores The Stories of Prisoners of War With Students

    Park ranger gestures toward earthworks while talking to students

    Park rangers have developed a series of lesson plans and on-site programs designed to help students from fifth through twelfth grade understand how the Camp Sumter military prison, commonly called Andersonville, fits into the larger story of the American Civil War. Tied to Georgia curriculum standards and the Common Core, these programs and activities use current research and primary sources to bring to life the individual experiences of prisoners of war. Read more

  • Historical Interpreter Apprentice Program Uses Youth to Tell American Stories

    Young man portraying a Union prisoner of war interacts with students

    The Historical Interpreter Apprentice Program (HIAP) is a youth engagement and outreach program in which local high school students receive training in historic interpretation. The program intends to expand the students’ knowledge of history, build experience in the field of public history, as well as develop a cadre of experienced young volunteers and incubate stewardship of the history resources found at Andersonville. Read more

Did You Know?

Grave 3585

About 150 African-American soldiers were believed to have been held at Andersonville. Of those 150, over 30 are known to have died at Andersonville. A number of the African-American prisoners were from the famed 54th Massachusetts Infantry. More...