• Photo of touchable historic three-dimensional map at the Alaska public lands information Center

    Alaska Public Lands

    Alaska

Camping FAQs

 
  1. Can you direct me to a campground? Can I reserve them in advance?Alaska Public Lands Information Centers can provide you with the Alaska Official State Map and the Alaska State Parks brochure. Both give details about public campground locations and facilities. A few campgrounds can be reserved: Denali National Park reserves 40% of the spaces in four campgrounds in advance by phone or fax (see question 2). Russian River, Ptarmigan Creek, Trail River, Cooper Creek and Williwaw campground spaces (Chugach National Forest) can be reserved by calling (800) 280-2267, TDD (800) 879-4496. All others are first-come, first-served. Many commercial campgrounds will take reservations.

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  1. We have an RV, where are campgrounds with sites that will fit our 32' rig? Are there any dump stations in your campgrounds? Can you give me a list of commercial campgrounds, too?Alaska Public Lands Information Centers has the Alaska Official State Map listing all public lands campgrounds. There is no master list of RV size accommodations for each campsite, however the Alaska State Parks brochure does state that most sites fit up to 35 feet. Several publications sold by the Alaska Natural History Association provide details on commercial RV parks (The Milepost, RVing in Alaska). Numerous visitor bureaus and Chambers of Commerce have brochures with lists of commerical RV parks and campgrounds. Alaska Public Lands Information Centers has Chamber of Commerce and visitor bureau address and phone lists.

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  1. Where can I learn how to be safe around bears, moose and other animals? Most of what you need, you already have...common sense. Keep your distance, let them know you are there, and don't run in panic. Bear Facts is a good brochure to review. Many public lands brochures discuss how to safely enjoy Alaska's wildlife.

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  1. We backpack and camp regularly in California, what can you tell us about minimum impact and safe camping/backpacking in Alaska? We have minimum impact camping/backpacking brochures covering water safety, clothing, gear, and general trip planning. Some of the differences between California and Alaska involve lower summer temperatures, more moisture, and greater potential for wildlife contacts.

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Did You Know?

Did You Know?

About 150 Dall sheep live on the cliffs along Turnagain Arm which is a part of Anchorage. Bear exist at Kincaid Park and along the hillside near homes. Two wolf packs live in the foothills of the Chugach Mountains.