• Image of four aviators at leisure, playing cribbage

    Aleutian World War II

    National Historic Area Alaska

Robert and Shirley Allen Johnson

Robert Johnson
Robert Johnson, along with his friend Bobby Boon, joined the Arkansas National Guard unit in Marianna Arkansas and became part of the 206th Coast Artillery Band. At the time the possibility of a war seemed remote and aside from basic training the Guard seemed to offer an opportunity to improve his play on their instruments. Much to their surprise both Johnson and Boon were activated in January 1941, the Guard federalized and sent to Alaska where they would remain for the duration of the war. At Dutch Harbor, and later on Amchitka, Johnson and Boon would be part of the 206th Medical Detachment and band. Learn more about the bombing of Dutch Harbor, what it was like to live and work in the Aleutians and more by reading Robert Johnson’s diary and Stephanie Johnson Dixon’s story entitled “What Daddy (And Mother) Did in the War” to learn more about the people and places in the photographs.

Shirley Allen
Shirley Allen (later Shirley Johnson) wanted to contribute to the war effort and put off going to college to do so. She made her way to Memphis and found work at the Army Depot, a 642 acre complex handling food and supplies for the troops and even served as a prisoner of war camp at one point. Shirley worked as an office clerk. After working long enough to put together a small nest egg Shirley set off for college at the University of Oklahoma. Her story accompanies that of her husband Robert Johnson in “What Daddy (And Mother) Did in the War.”
 
composite of WWII-era photos of uniformed Robert Johnson and Shirley Johnson
Courtesy Stephanie Johnson Dixon, from the collection of Robert T. Johnson, 206th Coast Artillery Band, El Paso, Texas (Ft. Bliss), 1941 and Dutch Harbor and Amchitka, Aleutian Islands. 1941-1945
 

Did You Know?

A Rommel stake

Anticipating a ground assault by the Japanese, the US military placed anti-personnel stakes in the ground on Amaknak Island during World War II. These stakes are made of iron, are very sharp and measure between 4 inches to 4 feet high.