• Image of four aviators at leisure, playing cribbage

    Aleutian World War II

    National Historic Area Alaska

Bob and Mac Eads

Mac Eads grew up in Nebraska and joined the CCC building duck habitat in his home state before the war broke out. Inducted in the Army just days before Pearl Harbor, his construction equipment skills would be put to use when he arrived in Chernofsky Bay on Umnak Island. He trained as a heavy weapons operator and had the chance to test his skills as Japanese and Allied aircraft fought over Umnak in early June 1942. He was involved in a burial unit retrieving the bodies of service men around the state and participated in body recovery for downed Canadian flyers at Makushin Bay. He returned to the Aleutians after the war working on salvage operations with his brother Bob.

Bob Eads had a love for aviation and signed up for whatever aviation positions the Army Air Corp had to offer. When finished training for aircraft mechanic he was transferred to pilot training and was assigned to fly the C-47. He flew for the 436th Group, 81st Squadron dropping ammo, supplies and paratroopers into seven major invasion fronts on the Eastern Front. After the war Bob and Mac married two sisters from Seward and started a variety of businesses that has kept them in Alaska ever since. Both brothers just barely survived the tidal wave following the 1964 earthquake. Learn more about the wartime history and lives of these two brothers in the interview below. Download a full transcript of the interview with Bob and Mac Eads.
 

 

Did You Know?

Image of floor tiles with acronym ALSEC

At Dutch Harbor, some Marines enjoyed the Bachelor Officers Quarters (BOQ) of the Naval Operating Base. The BOQ was the officers' club, holding a long bar, nice lounge area and fire place. In the center of the floor laid a terrazzo symbol of the Alaskan Sector Command (ALSEC). This terrazzo symbol was designed by Armand Rizan, and was laid in 1943. Today, it is located at the Museum of the Aleutians.