• Image of four aviators at leisure, playing cribbage

    Aleutian World War II

    National Historic Area Alaska

Robert Boon

Robert Boon, along with his friend Bob Johnson, joined the Arkansas National Guard unit in Marianna Arkansas and became part of the 206th Coast Artillery Band. He was just 16 years old. At the time the possibility of a war seemed remote and the Guard seemed to offer an opportunity to get away from home and get some free music lessons. Much to their surprise the Guard was activated in January 1941, was federalized and Boon and Johnson were sent to Alaska where they would remain for the duration of the war. At Dutch Harbor, and later on Amchitka, Johnson and Boon would be part of the 206th Medical Detachment and band. Learn more about the bombing of Dutch Harbor, what it was like to live and work in the Aleutians, how “Sneaky Pete” was made, how a coin toss changed the lives of Boon and Johnson and more by listening to Robert Boon’s interview below.

Also see Robert Johnson’s diary and Stephanie Johnson Dixon’s story “What Daddy (And Mother) Did in the War” to learn more about the lives of the members of the 206th Band.
 
historic photo of uniformed soldier, cot
Sgt. Bobby Boon, later Dr. Robert Boon, in the Aleutians.
Courtesy Stephanie Johnson Dixon, from the collection of Robert T. Johnson, 206th Coast Artillery Band, El Paso, Texas (Ft. Bliss), 1941 and Dutch Harbor and Amchitka, Aleutian Islands. 1941-1945. Photographer unknown.
 
 

 

Did You Know?

Image of floor tiles with acronym ALSEC

At Dutch Harbor, some Marines enjoyed the Bachelor Officers Quarters (BOQ) of the Naval Operating Base. The BOQ was the officers' club, holding a long bar, nice lounge area and fire place. In the center of the floor laid a terrazzo symbol of the Alaskan Sector Command (ALSEC). This terrazzo symbol was designed by Armand Rizan, and was laid in 1943. Today, it is located at the Museum of the Aleutians.