• Image of four aviators at leisure, playing cribbage

    Aleutian World War II

    National Historic Area Alaska

Telling Stories As Well As Dates

More than just a way to keep track of the date, the annually-produced Aleutian World War II calendar shares the often colorful, poignant or harrowing stories of the Aleutians, both before, during and after the war.

Few other places will you learn such anecdotes as the "Adak National Forest," an ill-fated attempt by the military to raise troop morale in the Aleutians by planting thousands of trees on the naturally tree-less island of Adak; the treatment of Pribilof Islanders by the U.S. government, a virtual enslavement where the government dictated every aspect of islanders' lives, even including who they could marry; or countless stories of wind and waves dashing planes from the sky, sinking ships and at times driving men insane.

 

Did You Know?

A Rommel stake

Anticipating a ground assault by the Japanese, the US military placed anti-personnel stakes in the ground on Amaknak Island during World War II. These stakes are made of iron, are very sharp and measure between 4 inches to 4 feet high.