Recent Natural Resource Publications (2012)

blue sky whispy clouds mountain over Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park
A bright sky over Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park

The National Park Service is actively engaged in natural resource science. Results of monitoring and research efforts are communicated through the Natural Resource Publication Series, posters and presentations at professional conferences, and publications in external, peer-reviewed journals. Recent publications are highlighted here, and a complete list of publications can be accessed through the Integrated Resource Management Applications database (IRMA).

report cover of 2011 butterfly surveys in katmai

2011 Katmai National Park Butterfly Surveys: Brooks Camp and Lake Camp

Sherri Anderson, Carissa Turner

The primary objective of this study was to gather baseline data on the diversity and abundance of butterfly species at Brooks Camp and Lake Camp in Katmai National Park (KATM). This information would be added to the North American Butterfly Association database and used in subsequent years to monitor butterfly populations. A secondary objective was to determine if the Alaskan Orangetip butterfly (Anthocharis sara alaskensis) occurs in suitable habitats, particularly the Brooks Camp area, within KATM. https://irma.nps.gov/App/Reference/Profile/2191632

report cover of 2010 seabird monitoring update

Seabird Colony Survey Report 2010 Kenai Fjords National Park and Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge

Laura Phillips, Brooke McFarland

Since 2007, KEFJ staff has conducted annual surveys of seabird colonies in KEFJ and AMNWR at some level. In 2010, we conducted a brief survey of select colonies in Aialik Bay and Northwestern Fjord in preparation for developing an intensive colonial seabird study that began in 2011. This report documents the work done in 2010 and summarizes the earlier studies. https://irma.nps.gov/App/Reference/Profile/2183516

report cover of peregrine falcon occupancy and productivity in kenai fjords 2011

Occupancy and Productivity of Peregrine Falcons in Kenai Fjords National Park Monitoring Activities 2011

Laura Phillips, Leslie Adams

In 2011, occupancy and productivity surveys were conducted for peregrine falcons as a part of a continued monitoring effort. Two surveys were conducted in May to locate peregrine falcons and to determine territory status (occupancy). Peregrine falcon nesting success and productivity surveys were undertaken opportunistically in June and July during colonial seabird surveys. They surveyed 18 nesting territories in the Kenai Fjords study area in 2011, 10 of which were occupied by peregrine falcons and three of those 10 contained chicks. 2011 survey efforts revealed interannual variation in the breeding distribution and behavior of falcons in the study area. https://irma.nps.gov/App/Reference/Profile/2184427

report cover of 2011 seabirds report in kenai fjords

Seabird Colony Survey Report 2011 Kenai Fjords National Park and Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge

Monika Parsons, Laura Phillips, Leslie Adams, Jennifer Curl

In 2011 we began intensively monitoring select colonies as part of a cooperative interagency project with AMNWR and University of Alaska Fairbanks to identify spatial and temporal variability of colonial seabirds within this region. We conducted shoreline surveys of the KEFJ coast to identify new seabird colonies, performed whole colony counts of most historic colonies, conducted repeated counts of historic black-legged kittiwake photo plots, and established new survey plots for cormorant species (red-faced, pelagic and double-crested), black-legged kittiwakes, common murres and glaucous-winged gulls. https://irma.nps.gov/App/Reference/Profile/2184568

report cover of 2012 habitat use and movement by grizzlies in Denali

Habitat Use and Movement Patterns of Grizzly Bears in Denali National Park Relative to the Denali Park Road

Rick Mace, Laura Phillips, Thomas Meier, and Pat Owen

The relationships between grizzly bear movements and vehicular traffic were investigated in Denali Park and Preserve in 2006. Hourly locations were obtained from May through September from global positioning system (GPS) collars fitted to 20 bears. Several behavioral effects of the road were inferred from telemetry data. First, bears moved faster when crossing the road than immediately before or after the crossing. Second, while in the inactive state, distance to the road increased with bout length and we concluded that bears were uncomfortable resting for prolonged periods near the road. These findings corroborate previous observational studies suggesting that some individual bears react negatively to vehicular traffic at relatively fine spatial and temporal scales, while others do not. https://irma.nps.gov/App/Reference/Profile/2184397

report cover of vehichles and wildlife sightings in denali 2006 - 2009

Assessment of Vehicle Use and Wildlife Sightings in Denali National Park and Preserve Summary Report 2006 - 2009

Laura M. Phillips, Bridget Borg and Melissa L. Snover

Managers at Denali National Park and Preserve initiated a series of concurrent studies in 2006 to develop greater understanding of the impacts of traffic volume and traffic patterns on the physical, biological and social environment of the Denali Park Road. This report summarizes information collected on traffic volume and wildlife viewing on the park road in 2006 – 2009 as part of these studies. https://irma.nps.gov/App/Reference/Profile/2186896

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Estimating Visits to Denali National Park and Preserve Spring/Summer 2011

Peter J Fix, Andrew Ackerman, Ginny Fay

This study was conducted to assist in refining Denali National Park and Preserve’s visitation estimation. Visitation estimates to Denali National Park and Preserve are based on a formula that includes the number of riders on buses plus an estimation of the number of visitors who do not travel past mile 15 on buses. The primary objective of this study was to calculate the number of visitors to the park who do not take a bus during each visit into the park during the 2011 summer season using a comprehensive sample of exiting visitors. https://irma.nps.gov/App/Reference/Profile/2191358

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2011 Denali National Park and Preserve Visit Characteristics

Peter J Fix, Andrew Ackerman, Ginny Fay

This study estimated visitor activities during recreation visits to Denali during spring and summer 2011. A profile of the characteristics of visits by the main activity of the visitors was developed. This study examined activities and their characteristics by visit, as opposed to by visitors. The study is the first in Denali to sample all arrival modes and major access points to the park (e.g., by plane, bus, car, train, bicycle, foot). This type of analysis provides insight into how Denali visitors spend time inside the park. In addition, this study estimated the total population of visits and developed weights to ensure estimates were representative of all visits to the park. Finally, this study sampled visits throughout the entire spring and summer visitor season and examined patterns of visitor activities throughout the season. https://irma.nps.gov/App/Reference/Profile/2192708

cover of glacier status and trends first progress report 2012

Alaskan National Park Glaciers - Status and Trends First Progress Report

Anthony Arendt, Chris Larsen, Michael Loso, Nate Murphy, Justin Rich

This is the first progress for a multi-year study of glaciers in Alaskan national parks. Here we present results from mapping of all glacier extents in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve (NP&P) and Denali NP&P, from measurements of surface elevation changes on select glaciers in Glacier Bay NP&P, and from focus glacier research on Brady, Margerie, and Muir Glaciers in Glacier Bay NP&P. https://irma.nps.gov/App/Reference/Profile/2190794

cover of glacier status and trends second progress report 2012

Alaskan National Park Glaciers: Status and Trends Second Progress Report

Anthony Arendt, Chris Larsen, Michael Loso, Nate Murphy, Justin Rich

This is the second progress for a multi-year study of glaciers in Alaskan national parks. Here we present results from mapping of all glacier extents in Katmai National Park and Preserve (NP&P) and Lake Clark NP&P and from measurements of surface elevation changes on select glaciers in Lake Clark NP&P. We also summarize field efforts to date associated with the focus glacier component of the project and present a sample focus glacier vignette. https://irma.nps.gov/App/Reference/Profile/2190796

cover of 2012 denali invasive plant management report

Invasive and Exotic Plant Management in Denali National Park and Preserve 2012 Summary Report

Henry Ring and Wendy Mahovlic

We report the efforts of the Exotic Plant Management Team for the 2012 field season. There were no new invasive species discovered within the park boundaries in 2012, and the size of previously documented infestations was declining year-to-year, possibly due to extensive hand-pulling of these species during the last several years. The primary focus of our efforts this season was continuing treatment of exotic plant infestations near the Railroad Depot, along the length of the Park Road, the Kantishna airstrip, the McKinley Park airstrip, the Kantishna Horse Corral, near the Sewage Lagoon, and mile 231 – 239 Parks Highway. The Wilderness Access Center and the Backcountry Information center were surveyed for invasive plants and treated for the first time since their construction. This year, the EPMT staff and volunteer crews pulled 2075 pounds of invasive plants, accrued 1,390 volunteer hours, treated 10.7 acres of the park for invasive species, and revegetated 1.95 acres of the park by planting native seeds. https://irma.nps.gov/App/Reference/Profile/2192606

cover of 2012 glacier bay invasive plant management report

Invasive Species Management in Glacier Bay National Park & Preserve

Shahed Dowlatshahi

We report the efforts of the Exotic Plant Management Team for the 2012 field season. Overall, 74.5 acres of land were inventoried for the presence of invasive species this season. Manual treatment was performed on 27 canopy acres, with 2.1 acres being the actual area treated for invasive species, taking into account the percent cover of the infestation as well as the percentage of the area treated. More than 4000 pounds of wet plant material, dirt, and gravel were removed and subsequently buried or burned this season. https://irma.nps.gov/App/Reference/Profile/2192702

cover of 2012 katmai invasive plant management report

Invasive Species Management for Katmai National Park & Preserve, Alagnak Wild River, and Aniakchak National Monument & Preserve 2012 Summary Report

Allison Connealy and Claire Parker

The 2012 Katmai Alaska Exotic Plant Management Team followed the protocol for surveying and controlling invasive plants from June through September. The majority of monitoring and manual control efforts occurred at Brooks Camp, Lake Camp, the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes Road and at Fure’s Cabin. Overall, continued manual treatment at heavily infested sites, such as the Brooks Camp cultural site, has significantly reduced the extent and density of infestations in these areas. Revisiting previously surveyed sites was a high priority this season as well as manually treating as many acres as possible. New infestations were found throughout Brooks Camp along the falls trail and the road to Lake Brooks. https://irma.nps.gov/App/Reference/Profile/2192703

cover of 2012 kenai fjords invasive plant management report

Invasive Plant Management for Kenai Fjords National Park 2012 Summary Report

Travis Fulton

This report describes the work performed by the Exotic Plant Management Team at Kenai Fjords National Park for the 2012 field season. As with previous seasons, monitoring and control work focused on the Exit Glacier area and along the Exit Glacier Road. Other areas within the park that were controlled in 2012 included sites on the outer coast in Nuka Bay, McCarty Fjord, and Aialik Bay. The Kenai Fjords Exotic Plant Management Team surveyed 21.4 acres of park lands and 5.5 acres outside park boundaries for invasive species. A total of 8.9 acres of invasive plant infestations were mapped. The team treated 7.3 acres of invasive plant infestations, 4.8 of these acres were controlled with herbicide. 488 pounds of invasive plants were manually pulled and removed from the park. https://irma.nps.gov/App/Reference/Profile/2192704

cover of 2012 klondike gold rush invasive plant management report

Invasive and Exotic Species Management for Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park 2012 Summary Report

Peter Frank

In 2012 the Exotic Plant Management Team at Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park focused on two primary objectives; accurately documenting the distribution and abundance of invasive species in and around the park and controlling existing infestations to prevent their spread into or within the park. Surveys by EPMT staff during the 2012 field season totaled 185.2 acres, 31.4 of which were inside KLGO boundaries. Within the areas surveyed, a total of 106.9 acres were found to be infested, 20.9 of which were in the park. Of the areas infested, a total of 5.3 acres were treated, 0.9 acres of which were on park lands. Overall, 43 exotic species were documented, 25 of which were documented inside the park. Eight new exotic species were discovered for the first time in 2012, three of which were found in the park. https://irma.nps.gov/App/Reference/Profile/2192705

cover of 2012 sitka invasive plant management report

Invasive and Exotic Species Management for Sitka National Historical Park 2012 Summary Report

Gina L. Bono

This report describes the work performed by the Exotic Plant Management Team at Sitka National Historical Park for the 2012 field season. Field work included surveying for, locating, mapping, and manually controlling plants exotic to the regions flora. Many non-native species were located within park boundaries, and the surrounding urban environment of Sitka. Most notable species found within the park were creeping buttercup, European mountain-ash, and common dandelion. New species detected this year were common groundsel, reed canary grass, and thyme leaf speedwell. A total 7 acres of infested area was found within the park. Additional focus was placed on the location, measuring, and mapping of European mountain-ash in an attempt to lay the groundwork for a long term management plan for this non-native tree. https://irma.nps.gov/App/Reference/Profile/2192706

cover of 2012 wrangell-st. elias invasive plant management report

Invasive Plant Management in Wrangell-St. Elias National Park & Preserve 2012 Summary Report

AnnMarie Lain & Miranda L. N. Terwilliger

This report describes the work performed by the Alaska Exotic Plant Management Team in Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve during the 2012 season. Invasive plant inventories and treatments occurred around the following locations: along the Nabesna road, Kennecott Mines National Historic Landmark, park-owned operations facilities, and several backcountry destinations within park lands. A total of 2,581 pounds of pulled weeds were bagged and then taken to an incinerator in Anchorage to be burned. Gross acres treated increased to 10.8 acres in 2012 from 8 acres in 2011. https://irma.nps.gov/App/Reference/Profile/2192707

Last Updated: September 11, 2013