Fire News

An ominous plume of smoke rises over trees in the distance
Smoke rises from the Currant Creek Fire in Lake Clark NP, 2013 (Photo credit: Courtesy of C&G Coray)

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Alaska's wildfire season is here. Please be safe with anything that could ignite a wildfire. Remember, you are responsible for the fires you start. We all have a hand in a safe fire season.

Also, be sure to check out the Alaska NPS Wildland Fire Flickr!


Recent Alaska Wildland Fire Updates

Information on fires in national parks:


June 23, 2015

Multiple Fires in Denali National Park and Preserve

Following a lightning storm that threw over 31,000 lightning strikes from June 19 - June 21, five wildfires are now burning in remote locations in Denali National Park and Preserve. None of the wildfires are threatening park structures or sensitive resources. Due to the remote locations, fire managers have opted to monitor these fires. Learn more about fires in Denali.


June 23, 2015

Multiple Fires in Lake Clark National Park and Preserve

Between June 19 and June 21, lightning strikes sparked two small wildfires in the Lake Clark National Park and Preserve. The fires are burning in a remote area of the preserve and will be allowed to take a natural course as it burns. Fire management specialists will periodically monitor the fires to observe its behavior and assess growth. Learn more about fires in Lake Clark.


June 20, 2015

Multi-Park and Preserve Fire Restrictions in Effect

Extreme Fire Danger: NPS Discourages Use of Open Fires

Very high fire danger exists in Lake Clark National Park and Preserve, Katmai National Park and Preserve, Denali National Park and Preserve, Kenai Fjords National Park, Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve, and Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve due to a lack of recent precipitation, high winds and hot, dry weather. Park officials have determined that it is necessary to prohibit the use of all open fires and activities.

The term "open fires" refers to any flame source not immediately extinguishable or controllable and applies to any form of wood or charcoal-based fire, even in established fire rings. Use of gas grills, backpacking or camp stoves using fuel or compressed canisters which can be regulated and shut off are still permitted.

Fire restrictions generally correspond to restrictions put in place by the State of Alaska; however, they are managed independently by the National Park Service. Decisions to lift or continue restrictions will be made by park staff and based on the wide geographic range and diversity of available fuels within the park boundaries.


June 11, 2015

Fire in Wrangell-St. Elias


On June 9, a lightning strike started the Chisana River 2 wildfire, 25 miles West of Beaver Creek, Yukon, Canada. On June 10, the fire made a large run that burned onto the Tetlin National Wildlife Refuge. Both the National Park and the Tetlin Refuge are open and no restrictions are currently in place.

More Information:


May 24, 2015

Fire in Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve


On May 24, fire detection flight spotted a lightning-ignited wildfire in the Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve. The Trout wildfire is burning in a limited protection areais being closely monitored. Read More

May 22, 2015

Denali National Park and Preserve: Park Staff Request Public to Use Extreme Caution This Holiday Weekend


Kathleen Kelly - (907) 683-9504

Very high fire danger exists in Denali National Park and Preserve due to a lack of recent precipitation, high winds and hot, dry weather. Park officials urge visitors to be especially careful with anything that may cause a spark this Memorial Day weekend.

The holiday weekend has, in the past, led to a number of wildfires that have accidently started by escaped campfires and other recreational activities. When high fire danger occurs, given an ignition source, fires can quickly spread.

While there are not yet fire restrictions in place which prevent the use of small cooking and warming fires or barbeques, visitors should be aware that conditions can quickly change, forcing park officials to implement fire restrictions on short notice.

While campfires are permitted in fire grates in the park�s campgrounds, campers should know how to properly manage and extinguish their campfires. Campfires should be kept small and contained within fire grates and should never be left unattended until the ashes are cold. They must also be put out if a windstorm is near and after each use.

Wildland fire managers ask visitors and residents to stay informed of fire danger and changing conditions this weekend. We all have a hand in a safe fire season.


May 21, 2015

High Fire Danger in Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve: Park Requests Your Diligence in Preventing Fires


Mark Keogh - (907) 822-7223

With extreme fire danger levels throughout eastern interior Alaska, and no relief in sight heading into the Memorial Day Weekend, Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve is asking visitors and residents to be diligent and use caution with all activities that could start a wildfire.

Lack of precipitation this spring and hot, windy weather has created extreme fire conditions, particularly in the interior and central Alaska. These conditions mean that given an ignition source, new fires may easily spread quickly.

The holiday weekend has, in the past, lead to a number of wildfires that are accidently started by escaped campfires and other recreational activities. While there are not yet fire restrictions in place to prevent the use of small cooking and warming fires or barbeques, diligence is mandatory for any activities that may cause a spark.

Wildland fire managers ask visitors and residents to stay informed of the fire danger and be aware of changing weather conditions. Please consider your safety and the safety of others and do your part to prevent human-caused fires. We all have a hand in a safe fire season.

Last Updated: June 22, 2015