Regulations

A park ranger addresses a group of visitors
A Lake Clark Ranger talking to visitors, Lake Clark National Park & Preserve. (NPS Photo- Kent Miller)
  • A park ranger addresses a group of visitors

    A Lake Clark Ranger talking to visitors, Lake Clark National Park & Preserve. (NPS Photo- Kent Miller)

  • A park ranger sits inside with three hikers

    A Denali Ranger explaining the rules of the park to hikers, Denali National Park & Preserve. (NPS Photo- Kent Miller)

  • A park ranger stands and addresses a room of visitors

    Safety is the topic of this lecture, Katmai National Park & Preserve. (NPS Photo- Kent Miller)

  • Passengers speaking to their tour's ship captain

    Passengers learning the in‘s & out‘s of their tour, Kenai Fjords National Park. (NPS Photo- Kent Miller)

Introduction

There are a variety of rules and regulations that help us protect park resources and provide visitors with a safe and enjoyable experience. Below are links to federal and state laws applicable to Alaska national park units and documents related to ongoing rulemaking efforts affecting Alaska park lands. Please also visit the specific park websites for more information on what activities are authorized in Alaska park areas. Specific questions about park regulations may also be addressed to the Regional Law Enforcement Specialist or the Superintendent of the park you plan to visit.

Wildlife Regulations

Following a robust public process, the National Park Service on October 23, 2015, published regulations which restrict certain sport hunting practices in national preserves in Alaska.

National preserves encompass about 20 million acres in Alaska, and are managed by the National Park Service. Sport hunting in preserves was authorized by Congress when they were established in 1980. Sport hunting in national preserves continues to be primarily regulated by the State of Alaska. The state-authorized practices being prohibited conflict with National Park Service law and policy. Units of the National Park System are managed for naturally-functioning ecosystems and processes. While sport hunting is allowed in national preserves in Alaska, NPS policies prohibit manipulating native predator populations, typically bears and wolves, to increase numbers of harvested species, such as caribou and moose.

Under the new federal regulations, which were proposed in 2014, most state-managed hunting practices and seasons are retained in the preserves. These regulations do not restrict or limit subsistence hunting under federal subsistence rules on NPS-managed lands. The new regulations make permanent several similar temporary restrictions which had been implemented annually for several years. The NPS received about 70,000 comments, and three petitions with a total of approximately 75,000 signatures, and collected input at 26 public meetings held across Alaska. The links below take you to the final rule and several supporting documents.

Last Updated: October 23, 2015