Working With Federally Recognized Tribes

Left: NPS employee shaking hands with tribesman. Right: NPS employee shaking hands with tribeswoman.
Left: Mentasta Traditional Council renews its Memorandum of Understanding with Wrangell St. Elias NPP.
Right: Dr. Katie John attends the Kendesnii Campground dedication in Wrangell St. Elias NPP. The campground name is in recognition of the connections of the Upper Ahtna Athabascan Indians to the Park. (NPS photos)
  • Left: NPS employee shaking hands with tribesman. Right: NPS employee shaking hands with tribeswoman.

    Left: Mentasta Traditional Council renews its Memorandum of Understanding with Wrangell St. Elias NPP.
    Right: Dr. Katie John attends the Kendesnii Campground dedication in Wrangell St. Elias NPP. The campground name is in recognition of the connections of the Upper Ahtna Athabascan Indians to the Park. (NPS photos)

  • Steamy pool in a snowy landscape

    Serpentine Hot Springs in the Bering Land Bridge NP has significant cultural and traditional meaning to Alaska Natives of the NW Arctic. (NPS Photo)

  • Silhoutted father and son throwing a net into the water from their boat

    Subsistence fishing with a net, passing on traditions to a younger generation. (NPS Photo)

  • Woman cutting fish with a knife

    Subsistence foods harvested on federal public lands in Alaska is a significant food source for many of Alaska's Native people. (NPS Photo)

  • Chief Dimentieff speaking with rangers and Denali in the background

    Chief Mitch Dimentieff at Denali National Park & Preserve. (NPS Photo/Kent Miller)

  • Left: aerial view of Nikolai, Alaska. Right: Nikolai international airport and city signs.

    More than 80 federally recognized tribes are located in communities adjacent to national parklands in Alaska. (NPS Photos)

The National Park Service has a unique political relationship with American Indian tribes which is based in the U.S. Constitution and hundreds of treaties, statutes, regulations, and policies, and strengthened by a shared commitment to stewardship of the land and resources. The Service will honor its trust responsibilities to American Indian tribes, in part, through government to government consultation on Service actions that may have a direct substantial impact to the interests of the 229 federally recognized tribes in Alaska.

NPS Alaska Region works with tribes on issues as diverse as subsistence, climate change, historic preservation, scientific research, ethnographic research, archaeological projects, mapping traditional lands, and many other topics. For more information on specific topics, please click on appropriate website links listed on this page.


Resources

Department of the Interior



Management of Subsistence Harvest on Federal Public Lands


For additional links to National Park Service programs and resources for tribes, see NPS American Indian Liaison Office.


Consultation with Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA) Corporations

Following Congressional direction given in 2004 and 2005, the Department of the Interior developed a Policy on Consultation with ANCSA Corporations that was adopted by the Department in 2012.

Last Updated: July 10, 2014