Alaska Exotic Plant Management Team

National Park Service
U.S. Department of the Interior

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Description: Naknek Lake in Katmai.

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2012 Proposed Treatments

The Alaska EPMT will continue herbicide treatment in 2012 consistent with the 2010 Environmental Assessment Alaska Region Invasive Plant Management Plan. Per the environmental assessment, teams will revisit 2011 treatment areas to monitor efficacy and conduct follow up retreatment, if necessary. Proposed 2012 treatment areas are listed below. Specific dates of application will be made available through the park at a later date when the application is more definite, and conveyed through the NPS Pesticide Use Proposal submission and National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permitting.

All proposed applications will be made by State of Alaska certified pesticide applicators using a precise, spot application method with calibrated backpack sprayers. Herbicide application is dependant on the target plant's growth stage and the weather. Applications will only be made when weather conditions are appropriate.

If you have any questions or would like more information please contact us. For information on the National Environmental Policy Act compliance documentation for this project please visit the National Park Service - Planning, Environment & Public Comment website.

Denali National Park & Preserve

  • Bird vetch in the park entrance area - This infestation has been manually controlled every year since 2005 but each year the infestation continues to spread to new areas of the park entrance area.
    Proposed treatment area: 0.67 acres
    Proposed herbicide: Milestone
    Proposed application: late June
  • Narrowleaf hawksbeard at the sewage lagoon - This infestation has been manually controlled every year since 2005 with no decrease in the infestation size or density. The park initiated herbicide treatments within a fenced area of the lagoon in 2009. Due to a construction project in this area, an herbicide treatment was applied in 2011. This is a follow up to the 2011 treatment.
    Proposed treatment area: 1.82 acres
    Proposed herbicide: Milestone
    Proposed application: June

Glacier Bay National Park & Preserve

  • Perennial sowthistle on Strawberry Island - This species does not respond to manual control methods in an infestation as large and dense as this one - 2.38 acres with 75-100% cover over most of the area. Only 0.33 acres of this infestation were able to be treated in 2011 due to inclement weather.
    Proposed treatment area: 0.96 acres
    Proposed herbicide: Milestone
    Proposed application: late August/early September
  • Reed canarygrass at the Maintenance Yard - This infestation has been manually controlled every year since 2007, when the area was infested with contaminated fill material. The area has erosion matting in place which does not allow for effective removal of the reed canarygrass rhizomes. This area was proposed for treatment in 2011, however it was cancelled due to inclement weather.
    Proposed treatment area: 2.03 acres
    Proposed herbicide: Habitat
    Proposed application: late August/early September

Katmai National Park & Preserve

  • Bird vetch along the Valley Road - This infestation was first discovered in 2009 and is a species which resists manual treatment. The location of this infestation makes it a high priority as it could easily spread along the length of the Valley Road. This infestation was successfully treated in the spring 2011. No other plants were found in subsequent monitoring later in the 2011 field season. This site will be revisited and if the infestation has resprouted it will be retreated.
    Proposed treatment area: 0.01 acres
    Proposed herbicide: Milestone
    Proposed application: late May/late June
  • Dandelion at Fure's Cabin - This infestation has been manually controlled every year since 2007 but the infestation has still grown in size and density. This infestation has the capability of spreading to other areas of the Bay of Islands or to spread up along the portage trail to Grosvenor Lake. This infestation was successfully treated in the spring 2011. Several plants were missed during the initial application due to high grass growth in the treatment area. This site will be revisited and retreated in 2012.
    Proposed treatment area: 0.89 acres
    Proposed herbicide: Milestone
    Proposed application: late May/late June
  • Sheep sorrel at Lake Camp - As the only location in the park accessible by road, Lake Camp is a major access point into the park for anglers, boaters, local residents, and NPS staff. This is the only infestation of this species detected in the unit, so it is a priority for control before it spreads. Manual control of this species since 2010 has not been effective because of the long, fragile roots in heavily compacted soils.
    Proposed treatment area: 1.82 acres
    Proposed herbicide: Milestone
    Proposed application: late May to late June

Kenai Fjords National Park

  • Dandelion in the Exit Glacier area - There are two infestations located in undisturbed areas of Exit Glacier: one across Exit Creek on the outwash plain and one in an area locally called the "Nike Stripe." Only the Exit Creek infestation was treated with herbicides in 2011.
    Proposed treatment area: 0.79 acres
    Proposed herbicide: Milestone
    Proposed application: late May/early June

Wrangell-St. Elias National Park & Preserve

  • Narrowleaf hawksbeard at Headquarters - This infestation has been manually controlled every year since 2007 with no decrease in the infestation size or density. This area was treated with herbicide in spring of 2011 but will need to be retreated due to the density of the infestation.
    Proposed treatment area: 0.57 acres
    Proposed herbicide: Milestone
    Proposed application: late May/early June
  • Common tansy at the Maintenance Yard - This infestation was first discovered in 2009 and has been manually controlled for three years. It is difficult to effectively control manually as it can reproduce by seed and vegetatively via an extensive rhizomatous system. The location of this infestation makes it a high priority as it could easily spread into the park through the movement of equipment.
    Proposed treatment area: 0.39 acres
    Proposed herbicide: Milestone
    Proposed application: late August/early September

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