• African Burial Ground National Memorial

    African Burial Ground

    National Monument New York

News

Civil War: The Untold Story

Great Divide Pictures

'Civil War: The Untold Story'

African Burial Ground National Memorial is pleased to be partnering with 12 other National Parks and 26 other institutions throughout the nation as a venue for the preview screening of Episode Five of Great Divide Pictures public television series 'Civil War: The Untold Story'. The screening is on Tuesday, February 4, at 7:30 p.m. at the Faison Firehouse Theatre in Harlem, N.Y.C. at 6 Hancock Place (on 124th St., between Morningside & St. Nicholas Avenues). Learn more.

 

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To learn more about African Burial Ground National Monument see our:

African Burial Ground National Monument Events Archive

The African Burial Ground National Monument is the first National Monument dedicated to Africans of early New York and Americans of African descent. It is the newest National Monument in New York City , joining the Statue of Liberty, Governors Island, and Castle Clinton.

 

Host An Event at the African Burial Ground National Monument

The African Burial Ground National Monument is available for special events. Interested parties will have to obtain and submit a permit. For information about permits contact the Visitor Center by dialing 212-637-2019.

 

The African American Experience Fund

The African American Experience Fund of the National Park Foundation supports National Parks and Historic Sites that celebrate and tell the story of African American history and culture. For more information...

Did You Know?

The Sankofa has strong associations with the African Burial Ground

New York's African Burial Ground is the final resting place of approximately 15,000 free and enslaved Africans. Dating from the late 17th century. It has been called one of the most important archaeological finds of our time. More...