• Views from Penobscot Mountain summit.

    Acadia

    National Park Maine

Principle 7: Be Considerate of Others

Leash Your Dog

  • Unleashed dogs may intimidate other hikers, especially children, and ruin the experience of peace and quiet sought by visitors. Taking a leashed dog into Acadia is a privilege that is not available in all national parks; help keep it that way.

Let Nature’s Sounds Prevail

  • Keep a quiet profile. Noise invades a sense of solitude and obscures natural sounds. Use cell phones or radios for emergencies only. If you must use them, be discrete; other visitors don't want to hear your conversation.

Yield to Other Hikers

  • Choose a durable surface and step aside before the other person.

Keep Your Group Small

  • Large groups increase the perception of crowding, are noisier, and impact the environment more than smaller groups.
  • If you have a group of ten or more, consider breaking into smaller groups or take different routes. If you rejoin for a rest break, be sure to use a durable surface that is large enough for the whole group.
  • Recommended maximum group sizes:
    • Hiking trails – 10 persons
    • Carriage roads – 10 persons
    • Sea kayaking/island use – 12 persons
    • Rock climbing – 12 persons
    • Off-trail use – 6 persons
  • Less is more!
 

When you are not home and not alone, courtesy is cool.

Did You Know?