• Eagle Lake covered in snow nearing dusk

    Acadia

    National Park Maine

There are park alerts in effect.
show Alerts »
  • Carriage Roads Closed

    All park carriage roads are closed until further notice to prevent damage during the spring thaw. For more information: (207) 288-3338

  • Trail Closures: Peregrine Falcon Nesting

    Precipice Cliff and Valley Cove areas are closed to all public entry until further notice for peregrine falcon nesting season. More »

  • Blackwoods Campground is open

    Blackwoods Campground is open and is sites are available by self-registration at the campground. More »

  • 2014 Season Openings

    Park Loop Rd, Cadillac Mountain Rd, & Hulls Cove Visitor Center is open. Call (207) 288-3338 or follow us on Facebook (www.facebook.com/AcadiaNPS) for more information More »

  • Jordan Pond boat ramp parking lot is closed for construction

    It's scheduled to reopen on June 28. There may be intermittent openings at the discretion of the contractor. The North Lot parking area will remain open for access to the Jordan Pond House Restaurant & hiking & biking trails.

Principle 3: Dispose of Waste Properly

Pack it in, Pack it out

  • Pick up trash wherever you go, even when it’s not yours.
  • Watch your micro trash (e.g., twist ties, food crumbs, fruit stickers, etc.).
  • Reduce waste before you go. Remove excess packaging, stickers, etc., even for a day hike.

Human Waste

  • Use facilities when available.
  • When you feel that first sign in your gut, start thinking about where you will go. Practice planned peristalsis.
  • Deposit solid human waste in catholes dug 6-8 inches deep at least 200 feet from water, camp, or trails. A trowel makes this job easier.
  • Pack out toilet paper and hygiene products. A double plastic bread bag system works fine.
  • Urinate on durable rock, gravel, or forest litter, not plants. Urine burns foliage, and wildlife will dig for salts. Get 200 feet from water, camp, or trails to spread impacts.
  • Step on durable surfaces en route to your business.
 

Can you dig it?

Did You Know?

A girl stands along the stone steps of the Kurt Diederich Path in this historic image taken around 1920.

Acadia National Park contains more than 120 miles of historic hiking trails. Many of these trails were established by local village improvement societies in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Today many of the historic features, such as stonework, are still visible.