• Views from Penobscot Mountain summit.

    Acadia

    National Park Maine

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  • Temporary Road Closure

    A section of the Western Mtn Road in Southwest Harbor will be closed until 8/18 while park crews replace a culvert with a new fish-friendly open bottom culvert. For more information and a map visit our Getting Around Page. More »

  • Trail Closure: Gorge Path weekdays, 7 am - 4 pm

    The section of the Gorge Path between the Hemlock Path intersection and the A. Murray Young Trail intersection is closed until rehabilitation work is completed. The closure will be in effect Mondays through Fridays only, from 7 am to 4 pm.

Principle 2: Travel and Camp on Durable Surfaces

People hike on a trail in single file.

The loss of soil and vegetation occurs at very low levels of use. These hikers are preventing damage by walking in single file and staying on the trail.

NPS/Jonathan Gormley

On the Trail - Fight Trail Widening and Braiding

  • Look up for the next blaze or cairn.
  • Stay on established trails to preserve fragile plants and soil, especially on summits, ridges, and open ledges covered with fragile lichens.
  • Hike single file in the center of the tread, no matter how rocky, muddy, or wet. Don't widen the trail by sneaking around the edges.
  • If you must step off-trail or take a break, always choose the most durable surface—bedrock, gravel, and dry grass are the best choices.

Off-Trail in Pristine Areas

  • If you travel off-trail, maintain a higher level of awareness and a stronger ethic and commitment to LNT.
  • Spread your use and impact. Have each person take a different route. Keep your group small: six or fewer.
  • Use the most durable surface. Avoid fragile foliose lichens and reindeer moss, often found on bedrock.
  • Avoid steep slopes, wetlands, stream banks, and subalpine vegetation.
  • Do not add to or build cairns, or flag or otherwise mark your route.

Camping
Backcountry camping is prohibited in Acadia because of its small size, high visitation, and the fire danger for our neighbors, but LNT applies at Blackwoods and Seawall Campgrounds, too!

 

Make every step count.

Did You Know?

A man boards the Island Explorer bus.

Since 1999, propane-powered Island Explorer buses have carried more than two million passengers in Acadia National Park, eliminating more than 685,000 automobile trips and preventing 6,444 tons of greenhouse gases. The fare-free buses are supported by your entrance fees. More...