• Views from Penobscot Mountain summit.

    Acadia

    National Park Maine

Ranger Minutes - Tips and Information

Park ranger sits on rocks.

Ranger Therese wants you to enjoy the trails.

Plan Your Hike
Videocast - Windows Media (6,388 KB) or Quicktime (2,021 KB)
Duration - 1 minute 37 seconds

Park Ranger Therese reminds you about things to consider when you plan a hike in Acadia.
 
Park ranger with bike stands near carriage road sign.

Learn how to bike safely from Ranger Chris.

Biking Safety
Videocast - Windows Media (5,147 KB) or Quicktime (2,235 KB)
Duration - 1 minute 40 seconds

Park Ranger Chris explains the rules of the road for bicycling throughout the park.
 
Park ranger crouches at the side of a tidepool.

Ranger Pete provides tips for tidepooling.

Tidepooling Tips
Videocast - Windows Media (6,292 KB) or Quicktime (1,889 KB)
Duration - 1 minute 35 seconds

Park Ranger Pete helps you safely explore the fascinating world of tidepools.

 
Park ranger stands on cobblestone beach

Ranger Chris guides your introduction to cobblestones.

Cobblestones of Acadia
Videocast - Windows Media (3,287 KB) or Quicktime (3,028 KB)
Duration - 2 minutes 33 seconds

Park Ranger Chris shows us what is special about enjoying the rocky shores of Acadia.

 
Park ranger stands outside park vehicle.

Ranger Therese shares tips for safe driving in the park.

Acadia Traffic Safety
Videocast - Windows Media (5,110 KB) or Quicktime (5,708 KB)
Duration - 2 minutes 40 seconds

Park Ranger Therese discusses traffic safety issues in the park.

 
Park ranger stands outside vehicle.

Ranger Chris discusses pets in Acadia.

Pets in Acadia
Videocast - Windows Media (3,154 KB) or Quicktime (3,291 KB)
Duration - 2 minutes 54 seconds

Park Ranger Chris shares ways to best experience the park with your pet.

Did You Know?

A girl stands along the stone steps of the Kurt Diederich Path in this historic image taken around 1920.

Acadia National Park contains more than 120 miles of historic hiking trails. Many of these trails were established by local village improvement societies in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Today many of the historic features, such as stonework, are still visible.