• Views from Penobscot Mountain summit.

    Acadia

    National Park Maine

Precipice and East Face Trails and Cliff Opened to Hiking

Subscribe RSS Icon | What is RSS
Date: July 28, 2006
Contact: Bruce Connery, (207) 288-8726
Contact: David Manski, (207) 288-8720

The Precipice and East Face Trails and cliff were opened on Friday, July 28, 2006 at Acadia National Park, Superintendent Sheridan Steele announced today. The peregrine falcons that have occupied the site since February have successfully raised four fledglings. The trail was closed in mid-March to support ongoing recovery efforts for the peregrine falcon in Maine, which is listed as an Endangered Species under the Maine Endangered Species Act.

The fledglings have become less dependent on the cliff and their parents over the last few weeks. Research has shown that nesting falcons are particularly vulnerable to human disturbance originating immediately above the nesting area or directed at the nest site. Continued disturbances can lead to chick mortality or complete nest failure, which further slows the recovery of the species in Maine. The closures of the trails during the nesting season has proven to be successful with more than 50 chicks fledging from the Precipice over the last 15 years and nearly 80 chicks from all cliffs within Acadia National Park. Biologists within Region 5 of the US Fish and Wildlife Service, of which Acadia National Park is located, who have been working on the recovery of the falcons in the Northeast, have been opening nesting areas on cliffs approximately five weeks after the last chick has fledged from the nest. This determination about opening closed areas is based on research results that found that fledglings were less dependent on the adults or their natal cliff area at or just after five weeks of being able to fly. Although the falcons, both adults and juveniles, are expected to stay in the vicinity of the Precipice Cliff and are likely to be observed by hikers and climbers, hiking and climbing activity is not expected to create disturbances that will harm the birds.

Additional information about the peregrine recovery program and cliff or trail closures is available at the park’s visitor center and headquarters.

Did You Know?

Cobblestone Bridge, faced with rounded cobblestones, has a stream running underneath.

The historic carriage road system at Acadia National Park features 17 stone-faced bridges spanning streams, waterfalls, cliffs, and roads. The design of each bridge, such as Cobblestone Bridge, is unique.