• Views from Penobscot Mountain summit.

    Acadia

    National Park Maine

Your Dollars At Work

trailwork

Your fees support rehabilitation of the park's historic trail system.

NPS

National park lands are not free. Protecting our natural and cultural heritage and providing a safe, enjoyable, and educational place to visit requires substantial funding. Although your taxes help offset the costs of operating parks like Acadia National Park, they do not cover all of the costs. As expenses to maintain and staff the parks rise each year, government funding is unable to keep up.

In an attempt to address this shortfall, Congress passed the Federal Lands Recreational Enhancement Act, which helps spread some of the operating costs among the people who use the parks.

 

How does it work?

 
All visitors-no matter where or how they enter-must pay a fee to enter Acadia National Park. Eighty percent of entrance fees, as well as camping and other fees, stay right here to be used for park projects. The remaining 20 percent is shared among parks that cannot collect fees because their founding legislation prohibits it.

 

How are my fees used?

 

Your fees are used for a variety of projects that improve the conditions of natural and cultural resources and make the park a safer place to visit.

  • User fees allow the park to rehabilitate roads, trails, historic structures, and other facilities.
  • When the transportation system is in operation, $10 from every park pass supports the fare-free Island Explorer bus system.

 

Did You Know?

A Passamaquoddy birchbark basket with the image of a moose on it

The Passamaquoddy Kit is an educational tool for teachers to help teach students about Passamaquoddy culture in Maine. The kit is a collaboration between the Abbe Museum and Acadia National Park staff.