• Views from Penobscot Mountain summit.

    Acadia

    National Park Maine

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  • Trail Closure: Gorge Path weekdays, 7 am - 4 pm

    The section of the Gorge Path between the Hemlock Path intersection and the A. Murray Young Trail intersection is closed until rehabilitation work is completed. The closure will be in effect Mondays through Fridays only, from 7 am to 4 pm.

  • Bubble Pond Carriage Road closure

    Bubble Pond Carriage Road will be closed to all traffic Monday 9/15- Wednesday 9/17 from the parking lot to Triad-Day Mountain Bridge. More »

Park Planning

Management Plans

 

Planning plays an essential role in managing the natural and cultural resources and facilities at Acadia. Listed below are the major planning documents pertaining to the park. Please be patient, as many of the plans are large documents that take some time to open.

Plans and projects that are open for public review are listed on the Planning, Environment, and Public Comment (PEPC) website.

Plans
General Management Plan
Schoodic General Management Plan Amendment
Land Protection Plan and maps
Business Plan
Climbing Management Plan

Commercial Services Plan

Hiking Trails Management Plan

Island Explorer Shuttle Bus System

 

Advisory Commission

 

The purpose of the Acadia National Park Advisory Commission is to advise the Secretary of the Interior through his or her designee, the superintendent of Acadia National Park. The superintendent consults with the commission regarding the management and development of the park.

The commission was established by the 1986 park boundary legislation (Public Law 99-420) and amended by Public Law 110-229 in 2008. The commission terminates in 2026. The bylaws describe the commission in more detail. Meetings are open to the public; meeting notices appear in the Federal Register.

Four standing committees make recommendations for action to the commission.

  • Science and education
  • Land conservation
  • Park use
  • Historical/cultural
Recent meeting notes:

Did You Know?

The wide carriage road is lined by the spring foliage of birch trees.

Acadia National Park's carriage road system, built by John D. Rockefeller Jr., has been called “the finest example of broken stone roads designed for horse-drawn vehicles still extant in America.” Today, you can hike or bike 45 miles of these scenic carriage roads in the park.