• Views from Penobscot Mountain summit.

    Acadia

    National Park Maine

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  • Temporary Road Closure

    A section of the Western Mtn Road in Southwest Harbor will be closed until 8/18 while park crews replace a culvert with a new fish-friendly open bottom culvert. For more information and a map visit our Getting Around Page. More »

  • Trail Closure: Gorge Path weekdays, 7 am - 4 pm

    The section of the Gorge Path between the Hemlock Path intersection and the A. Murray Young Trail intersection is closed until rehabilitation work is completed. The closure will be in effect Mondays through Fridays only, from 7 am to 4 pm.

Research Guidelines

The National Park Service (NPS) recognizes that science must play an increasingly central role in designing responsible and sustainable use and management activities of the national parks. In addition to the use of science as a means to improve park management, parks can be centers for broad scientific research and inquiry. Therefore, the NPS will facilitate research in parks where it can be done without impairing other park values.

The following resources provide guidance to potential investigators who wish to conduct research at Acadia National Park:

Application Procedures
To obtain initial permission to conduct field research and/or collecting of specimens within areas administered by the National Park Service, you are required to complete and submit materials that enable park staff to evaluate the proposed activities and potential impacts on resources, policy, and visitor experiences. These materials include:

  • application form,
  • study proposal, and
  • copies of existing peer-reviews or the names of individuals you recommend to review your proposal.

To begin the permit application process, visit the NPS Research Permit and Reporting System (RPRS) website.

The RPRS website also contains instructions for the application process, frequently asked questions, links to other research-related websites, and links to submit or view Investigator Annual Reports (IARs)—reports detailing the accomplishments of ongoing or completed research projects.

 
Two researchers crouch near shore, one writing, one counting species.
Acadia's diverse habitats offer a variety of research opportunities, including studies focused on intertidal ecology.

Did You Know?

The wide carriage road is lined by the spring foliage of birch trees.

Acadia National Park's carriage road system, built by John D. Rockefeller Jr., has been called “the finest example of broken stone roads designed for horse-drawn vehicles still extant in America.” Today, you can hike or bike 45 miles of these scenic carriage roads in the park.