• Views from Penobscot Mountain summit.

    Acadia

    National Park Maine

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  • Trail Closures: Peregrine Falcon Nesting

    Precipice Cliff, Valley Cove, and Jordan Cliff areas are closed to all public entry until further notice for peregrine falcon nesting season. More »

  • Cultural Connections programs rescheduled for 7/16/2014 due to weather

    Ash Log Pounding demo will take place today 11 am-3 pm at the Abbe Museum downtown (26 Mount Desert St, Bar Harbor). The Burnurwurbskek Singers have been rescheduled to perform on Cadillac Summit next Wed, July 23 at 11 am.

  • Trail Closure: Gorge Path weekdays, 7 am - 4 pm

    The section of the Gorge Path between the Hemlock Path intersection and the A. Murray Young Trail intersection is closed until rehabilitation work is completed. The closure will be in effect Mondays through Fridays only, from 7 am to 4 pm.

Reports

Collecting specimens in water.
Collecting specimens in water.
NPS
 

Are you looking to apply for a research permit?
Read the information below, and then go to the NPS Research Permit and Reporting System (RPRS).

 

Different types of reports and why we require them

 

Investigator's Annual Reports

An Investigator's Annual Report (IAR) is a form that is filled out on the Research Permit and Reporting System (RPRS). It includes information such as the status of the study (continuing or completed), a brief summary of the status and findings of the project, and if you are collecting specimens, what was collected and where it is being stored until your study is completed.

The park uses IARs to track the status, findings, and changes in studies. If you are collecting specimens, the park (as a part of its management responsibility) also wants to know what you are collecting and how you are storing and managing specimens. These reports allow park staff to identify potential opportunities for collaboration or synergies with other efforts in the park and to minimize conflicts and negative impacts to natural and cultural resources, visitors, and other research.

 

Final Reports

Final reports consist of a report summarizing the purpose, methods, findings, and implications of your study. There is no required format for final reports, although the general format of a scientific paper or report works well in most cases--i.e., introduction, methods, results, discussion, and conclusions or recommendations. You may submit a draft or published version of a scientific paper as a final report.

Final reports are circulated among park staff, become a part of the permanent park archives and bibliography, and are posted on the National Park Service Integrated Research Management Applications. Park managers use these reports to inform management plans and decisions. Additionally, scientists and educators use them to inform research and education programs.

 

Data

We ask that you share your data, preferably by archiving it in a permanent repository, such as those participating in DataONE (dataone.org/contribute-data), and sharing with us a link to the data and metadata. Please include the link in your final reports and IARs. You can also email a link directly to the Science Coordinator and Science Information and Communications Manager. DataONE has excellent guidelines and tools for managing, sharing, and archiving data.

 

GIS Data

As soon as practicable, send the Science Coordinator and Science Information and Communications Manager the specific latitude and longitude, using the WGS84 datum, of your research site(s). This will help us track research sites to avoid conflicting uses of the land. You are also required to submit all final GIS data layers and associated metadata developed as a result of your research. "Base layers," such as USGS roads, shorelines, streams, etc., do not need to be submitted unless (a) you have modified them drastically or (b) you have made changes that pertain to your study that would be difficult or impossible to duplicate. All geospatial data should be submitted as ArcGIS shapefiles, geodatabases, GRID or other ArcGIS-compatible formats. The preferred coordinate system is Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) Zone 19N using the North American Datum of 1983 (NAD83) and, if applicable, the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD88). If you need more information, contact the park's GIS Specialist.

 

Information about specimens

If you are collecting specimens, please see Information on Collecting Specimens, which explains what information we need about your specimens.

 

For help on how to submit IARs and final reports, please see the Help Page on RPRS or email the Science Information and Communications Manager.

Did You Know?

CCC members take a break from their work to admire the view along the ocean.

The Civilian Conservation Corps performed important work in Acadia National Park, including clearing brush, setting stones, and constructing Seawall Campground. Today park headquarters is located in the former CCC camp.