• The First Lincoln Memorial

    Abraham Lincoln Birthplace

    National Historical Park Kentucky

Frequently Asked Questions

How do I get to the Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historic Site?

From the North: Take Interstate 65 South to Exit 91 (Elizabethtown). Follow KY 61 (Lincoln Parkway) 13 miles south to the park, picnic entrance on left and main entrance on right.

From the South: Take Interstate 65 North to Exit 81 (Sonora). Proceed east on KY 84 to KY 61. Turn right on KY 61, three miles to park; picnic entrance on left and main entrance on right.

From Boyhood Home Unit at Knob Creek: Turn right onto US 31E. Proceed southwest for approximately 10 miles, picnic entrance on left and main entrance on right.

How do I get to the Boyhood Home Unit at Knob Creek?

From Lexington, KY: Take US 60 West to Exit 72 (Martha Layne Collins Bluegrass Parkway). Proceed on Bluegrass Parkway to Exit 21 (Bardstown, US 31E). Follow US 31E for approximately 20 miles; entrance on right.

From Louisville, KY: Take Interstate 65 South to Exit 91 (Elizabethtown). Follow KY 61 (Lincoln Parkway) approximately 10 miles south. Turn left onto KY 84. Turn left onto US 31E. Proceed northeast for approximately 8 miles; entrance on left.

From the South: Take Interstate 65 North to Exit 81 (Sonora). Proceed east on KY 84. Turn left onto US 31E. Proceed northeast for approximately 8 miles; site off to left.

From the Birthplace Unit: Turn left out of park onto US 31E (KY 61). Proceed northeast for approximately 10 miles; entrance on left.

How many miles is the park (Birthplace Unit) from the closest major cities?

In Kentucky:

Louisville – 55 miles

Bowling Green – 76 miles

Lexington – 87 miles

Owensboro – 106 miles

Richmond – 109 miles

Out of State:

Nashville, TN – 118 miles

Cincinnati, OH – 160 miles

Evansville, IN – 167 miles

Huntsville, AL – 228 miles

Atlanta, GA – 360 miles

Springfield, IL – 375 miles

How do I make a group reservation?

Simply call the Birthplace unit at (270) 358-3137. Additional information can be obtained by clicking here.

Which time zones are the units located in?

Both the Birthplace Unit and the Boyhood Home Unit at Knob Creek are located in the Eastern Time Zone. Visitors coming from the south will cross the boundary from the Central Time Zone at the northern Hart County line.

Does it cost anything to visit?

Both the Birthplace Unit and the Boyhood Home Unit at Knob Creek DO NOT charge an admission fee.

What are the hours of operation?

Hours vary by season. For additional information click here.

What kinds of programs or activities are available?

A 15 minute movie, Ranger led programs, hiking, and much more are available between the two sites. Be sure to note times and seasonal offerings when applicable.

What kinds of programs are available for kids?

The Junior Ranger program, Build Your Own Log Cabin, and other activities are available between the two sites. Click here and be sure to note times and seasonal offerings when applicable.

What does strenuous mean?

Hiking the Overlook Trail requires some exertion on the part of visitors. In general, if you are accustomed to walking without getting severely winded, have no difficulty walking up a steep incline, and have no heart, respiratory, or similar impediments, you should be able to hike the strenuous trail with little difficulty.

What kind of clothes should be worn for hiking?

When hiking park trails please wear clothing appropriate for the season and hiking boots or sturdy shoes. Also carry plenty of water and insect repellant. For climate information please click here (information near bottom of page).

Can I get an information packet sent to me?

Almost all the information we would include in an information packet is also contained in this website. We would, however, be pleased to send you an information packet if you wish. For contact information please click here (information near bottom of page).

Does the park provide food services i.e. vending machines?

Neither site carries any type of food service. There are water fountains available at the Birthplace Unit. The Boyhood Home Unit at Knob Creek currently has no potable water; measures are in the process to provide water in the future. However, both units do provide picnic areas to visitors on a first come first serve basis during park operational hours.

May I take a rock/stick/piece of wood from the sites home with me?

No. As with all National Parks, taking souvenirs of any kind is prohibited. If you see a rock/stick/piece of wood or another object that interests you, it would probably interest someone else as well – please leave the object where you find it.

Does the park provide any type of educational resources?

Teacher educational resources (curriculum packet and traveling trunk information) may be obtained by contacting the Birthplace Unit. For contact information please click here (information near bottom of page).

When was the park established?

Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historical Park was established by the Lincoln Farm Association in the early 1900s. The site was donated to the federal government and became a national park on July 17, 1916. At that time it was called the Abraham Lincoln National Park.

The Boyhood Home Unit at Knob Creek was established by the Howard Family in the 1930s. It stayed within the family until it was added to the national park system on November 6, 2001 by donation. It is currently administered by the Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historic Site.

Why was the park established?

Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historical Park was established to preserve and conserve the birthplace of Abraham Lincoln, the sixteenth President of the United States, while perpetuating his memory.

The Boyhood Home Unit at Knob Creek was established to preserve and conserve the childhood, ages 2 to 7, home of President Abraham Lincoln.

Did You Know?

A picture of President Abraham Lincoln

Lincoln was the first president to give national status to Thanksgiving Day. His last proclamation, October 20, 1864, appointed and set “apart the last Thursday of November...to be observed by all…as a day of thanksgiving and praise to Almighty God, the beneficent Creator and Ruler of the universe.”